Six Things to Consider Before Bringing a Dog Home

How to choose the right dog for you and your family

Having a dog is a great and awesome decision that must be thoroughly considered before delving into it. Dogs bring loads of joy and excitement into the home. No argument about that! But this also means you have more responsibilities.

Therefore, you and everyone in the family must be ready to adapt to this new lifestyle.

Factors like the size of one's home, family size, allergies, lifestyle, and experience are all essential points to consider when choosing the right dog. Learning about various dog breeds, behavior, care, and characteristics is an excellent way to start.

This information will help you choose a dog breed that will fit nicely into your family and lifestyle. Below are some tips that will help you choose the right dog for you and your family.

1. Evaluate the space in your home.

Your home space will affect the choice of dog you want to buy; therefore, do a sincere evaluation of your living environment, especially your size. Do you stay in a tiny apartment or a house with plenty of space? Houses with little space are a good option for small dogs, while large dogs need large living spaces. If your home is a rural setting with a lot of room for dogs to roam, getting a dog breed that runs well and responds positively to training will be a good option. They will appreciate the freedom to roam while coming home when called. Please note, they will have to be trained! to come when called. 

dogs running outside

2. Identify your family allergies

It is also important to note the allergies that can affect the family. Dog saliva and hair can cause eye-watering and itching allergies for some people. Every dog breed sheds hair, but the extreme of each dog's shedding is different. For families susceptible to these allergies, it will be better suited for them to go for a low shed dog breed.

3. Access your time and availability 

Whether large or small, some dogs possess high energy, and they need more attention and time. For people that do not get to have a lot of free time, getting a smaller or even adopting a senior dog is most appropriate.

Dog with adopt me sign

4. Work with your budget

According to ASPCA, it can cost about seven hundred dollars to nine hundred dollars to maintain a dog for a year. I know ours cost MUCH more than those numbers! For dogs with health issues, this will increase the cost. So it is better to be sure that one's budget can accommodate this new family member.

5. Ensure the timing is good for a dog

Dogs need a lot of care and attention, so be sure to consider the time and attention available before getting one. It would be best if you took an honest review of your lifestyle and your family to determine whether it is the right time. If you travel a lot or have to be out for twelve hours or more, this might not be the best time to bring a dog into your home. Have it at the back of your mind that you need to spend ample time with them as they grow up to become adults to ensure familiarity.

6. Define your aim

Do you need a small lap dog that you can always carry around and adopt as a best friend? Do you need a watch or guard dog, or do you want to train it to perform specific tasks? Whatever reason you are wanting a dog should be defined before bringing them home. This will go a long way in streamlining your options and preparing for a dog.

Conclusion

Never decide to get a dog on impulse because the cost of care and responsibility is relatively high. It would be best to consider the cost of raising it, plus the time you have to care the new family member. 

It is best to ensure you have the time and means to take care of them before deciding to bring them home. I have worked at shelter where dogs were relinquished because the owner's did not have the time or finances to take care of them properly. This is devastating to all involved in the process. 

Dog owners that take the time to evaluate their situation, train, and educate themselves on having a dog will have a wonderful connection to their new pooch!

Wags & Woofs!